Senior In Home Care San Diego CA – Are You Prepared to Care for Aging Parents?


Senior in-home care, san diego, ca -

Are You Prepared to Care for Aging Parents?

By Nancy Mann Jackson

Step 1 of the three steps you can take to be ready to help with your parents’ care:

1. Start the conversation.

Talking with your parents or other relatives about their health-care preferences may be uncomfortable, but waiting until they need care is too late. “Families need to talk before they need answers,” says Patricia Maisano, CEO and founder of IKOR USA, which provides advocacy services for seniors. “Before crises, there are many more choices in everything. When you wait until a crisis arises, those choices diminish significantly.” During a crisis, siblings could disagree about medical care, finances and living situations, Maisano says. And if a parent is incapacitated, his or her own preferences are unlikely to be heard or followed.

In general, Huber says, a good time to begin talking about parents’ health care is when parents are in their 70s and children are in their 40s. He and his brother, both in their 40s, recently sat down with their parents and went through Home Instead’s free Senior Emergency Kit, which offers a checklist of basic information that adult children should know about their parents, such as physicians’ names, medications and doses, allergies, and how to access advance health-care directives.

Starting these conversations can be difficult. “If children initiate the discussion, they should explain to the parent that they want to make sure they are aware of the parent’s wishes, and that they will best be able to see to those wishes if the lines of communication remain open,” Maisano says.

CaregiverStress.com offers a number of resources to get these “40/70″ conversations started, including techniques for diffusing the emotions involved in such discussions.

Leave a Comment

Share how you are dealing with your parent’s alzeheimer’s or dementia.

Get your FREE Guide to Senior Inhome Care at www.seniorcarechoicessd.com

NEED a CAREGiverSM

Compassionate CAREGivers are ready to help seniors live independently at home.
Inquire about service today!

Become a CAREGiverSM

Seeking employment? Have what it takes to help seniors lead rewarding lives?
Inquire about being a CAREGiver

Jessica Perez
Office Manager

Home Instead Senior Care
Secure Care Inc.
9665 Granite Ridge Dr. Ste. 205
San Diego, CA 92123 USA
P: 858.277.3722
F: 858.277.6737
homeinsteadsd@aol.com
www.homeinstead.com/158
Each Home Instead Senior Care Franchise
is independently owned and operated.

Senior In Home Care, San Diego, CA – Are You Prepared to Care for Aging Parents?


Senior in-home care, san diego, ca -

Are You Prepared to Care for Aging Parents?

By Nancy Mann Jackson

Fewer than half of baby boomers are knowledgeable about their parents’ medical histories, and 49 percent are unable to name any of the medications their parents take every day, according to a new study by the Boomer Project, a behavior-tracking and research firm. In an emergency, such information could be vital to ensuring proper care.

In addition to knowing your parents’ medical histories and current medications, there are other things you should do to be prepared to help them in a health crisis. “We see families all the time who are thrust into emergency situations and are unprepared to handle their parents’ health issues,” says Jeff Huber, president and chief operating officer of Home Instead, which offers home health care and senior companionship. “The time to prepare is when things are calm.”

Here are three steps you can take to be ready to help with your parents’ care: They will be covered in future posts.

Leave a Comment

Share how you are dealing with your parent’s alzeheimer’s or dementia.

Get your FREE Guide to Senior Inhome Care at www.seniorcarechoicessd.com

NEED a CAREGiverSM

Compassionate CAREGivers are ready to help seniors live independently at home.
Inquire about service today!

Become a CAREGiverSM

Seeking employment? Have what it takes to help seniors lead rewarding lives?
Inquire about being a CAREGiver

Jessica Perez
Office Manager

Home Instead Senior Care
Secure Care Inc.
9665 Granite Ridge Dr. Ste. 205
San Diego, CA 92123 USA
P: 858.277.3722
F: 858.277.6737
homeinsteadsd@aol.com
www.homeinstead.com/158
Each Home Instead Senior Care Franchise
is independently owned and operated.

Senior In Home Care, San Diego, CA – FREE webinar for Alzheimer’s Caregiver


Senior in-home care, san diego, ca -

Caring for Someone with Alzheimer’s – Family Caregiver Webinar

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 | 10:00 AM Pacific / 11:00 AM Mountain / 12:00 PM Central / 1:00 PM Eastern. Register Now.

Caring for a senior loved one can bring a sense of fulfillment, but usually not without a few challenges as well. To help you feel a little more confident and equipped in your role as a family caregiver, the Home Instead Senior Care® network is launching the 2012 Family Caregiver Support Web Seminar Series, featuring free monthly seminars for family caregivers on a variety of essential caregiving topics.

The web seminars, hosted in cooperation with the American Society on Aging (ASA), provide tips, information and advice from the perspective of professionals who are well-versed in issues facing families caring for aging loved ones.

Please note, these Family Caregiver Webinars are not eligible for CEU credits. The CEU credit offering is only available for the webinars featured in the Professional Family Caregiver series.

Please pre-register for any Family Caregiver Webinar by the deadline of 9 PM PST the day before! for the following 2012 Senior Care Web Series. Please click each “Register Now” link for more details of each webinar and to sign up.

Recorded webinars will be available for viewing following the live sessions. It may take up to two weeks following the session for the archived version to be posted.

 

Learn more about the dementia care services available from Home Instead Senior Care.

Leave a Comment

Share how you are dealing with your parent’s alzeheimer’s or dementia.

Get your FREE Guide to Senior Inhome Care at www.seniorcarechoicessd.com

NEED a CAREGiverSM

Compassionate CAREGivers are ready to help seniors live independently at home.
Inquire about service today!

Become a CAREGiverSM

Seeking employment? Have what it takes to help seniors lead rewarding lives?
Inquire about being a CAREGiver

 

 

 

Jessica Perez
Office Manager

Home Instead Senior Care
Secure Care Inc.
9665 Granite Ridge Dr. Ste. 205
San Diego, CA 92123 USA
P: 858.277.3722
F: 858.277.6737
homeinsteadsd@aol.com
www.homeinstead.com/158
Each Home Instead Senior Care Franchise
is independently owned and operated.

Senior In Home Care, San Diego, CA – Alzheimer’s and Dementias FREE Training


Senior in-home care, san diego, ca -

Free Training Program Focuses on Coping with Difficult Behaviors Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease or Other Dementias

Alzheimer's e-Learning Course

“For days, my husband has been asking the same question: ‘What day is this?’ He does not want to put friends or helpers to any trouble including him in meetings or get-togethers. He’ll just drop out. He is so dependent on everyone since he is not allowed to drive anymore. His beloved truck and family sedan just sit and wait. He still smiles and hums, but would rather sit alone and read. He shows love, but is so quiet and silently interested . . . I don’t understand.”

This caregiver—whose spouse has Alzheimer’s disease—describes the frustration and confusion that grips families whose seniors are dealing with the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

The characteristics of these diseases are varied and change with time, but often leave families and their caregivers frightened and ill-equipped while they try to provide at-home care for their seniors.

A new groundbreaking training program now offers help for the many families who are dealing with challenging behaviors including refusal, delusions (or false beliefs), aggression, false accusations, wandering and agitation.

The Alzheimer’s Disease or Other Dementias CARE: Changing Aging Through Research and Education℠ Training Program takes away some of the dread associated with these diseases. The no-cost program, which is available to families through their local Home Instead Senior Care® office, provides an innovative approach that helps families make the most of a senior’s life journey. The unique approach includes the history, passions and hobbies of the person with Alzheimer’s disease to help manage challenging behaviors associated with dementias.

“CARE is a wonderful hands-on approach that helps caregivers deal with the behavioral changes that too often accompany these disorders—one of the biggest stressors for caregivers,” said Dr. Jane F. Potter, chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. “There was previously no good program available using adult education techniques to provide hands-on practice in learning how best to help people who suffer from dementia. This is huge.”

Resources of the Alzheimer’s Disease or Other Dementias CARE Training Program can help family caregivers understand Alzheimer’s disease and the changes they can expect to see in their loved ones. With the increased knowledge of Alzheimer’s and how to deal with it, family caregivers will be better able to cope with the stress of their responsibilities.

Local Home Instead Senior Care offices can provide even more information about making the most of living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, giving caregivers hope for a brighter future. Too often, a family caregiver can become overwhelmed—physically and mentally—with providing in-home care and can see a slide in his or her health.

Subscribe to http://www.homeinsteadsd.wordpress.com and get these great stories right in your email. Just put in your email on the right.

Get your FREE Guide to Senior Inhome Care at www.seniorcarechoicessd.com

NEED a CAREGiverSM

Compassionate CAREGivers are ready to help seniors live independently at home.
Inquire about service today!

Become a CAREGiverSM

Seeking employment? Have what it takes to help seniors lead rewarding lives?
Inquire about being a CAREGiver

Jessica Perez
Office Manager

Home Instead Senior Care
Secure Care Inc.
9665 Granite Ridge Dr. Ste. 205
San Diego, CA 92123 USA
P: 858.277.3722
F: 858.277.6737
homeinsteadsd@aol.com
www.homeinstead.com/158
Each Home Instead Senior Care Franchise
is independently owned and operated.

Senior In Home Services, San Diego, CA – Alzheimer’s and Dementia Share Your Tips


Senior In-Home Services, San Diego, CA -

Many families touched by Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias find great comfort in taking a trip down memory lane together. That trip might entail looking at old photo albums, telling stories, baking those special apple dumplings together, creating a memory quilt out of Dad’s old uniforms, listening to music from Mom’s teenage years, or any number of creative ways to reminisce. Recalling and preserving cherished memories can make facing memory loss just a little more bearable, both for the family and the individual with dementia.

What helpful ideas for reminiscing do you have? Help other Alzheimer’s families out by sharing your tips here.

3/29, 2012

Record Memories

Submitted by virginia turner

My dad was always telling jokes and making up songs…he was just a very funny person. So I started laying a recorder on the table while I was cooking and he was having coffee and just let him do his thing. Now ,I can still hear his voice and laugh at his jokes.

Please submit your tips with us in our comments section.

Get your FREE Guide to Senior Inhome Care at www.seniorcarechoicessd.com

NEED a CAREGiverSM

Compassionate CAREGivers are ready to help seniors live independently at home.
Inquire about service today!

Become a CAREGiverSM

Seeking employment? Have what it takes to help seniors lead rewarding lives?
Inquire about being a CAREGiver

 

 

 

Jessica Perez
Office Manager

Home Instead Senior Care
Secure Care Inc.
9665 Granite Ridge Dr. Ste. 205
San Diego, CA 92123 USA
P: 858.277.3722
F: 858.277.6737
homeinsteadsd@aol.com
www.homeinstead.com/158
Each Home Instead Senior Care Franchise
is independently owned and operated.

Is Alzheimer’s inherited? San Diego Senior In Home Care


San Diego Senior In Home Care – The keynote speaker at a recent Alzheimer’s Association Is Alzheimer's Inherited?conference had just wrapped up his presentation and asked for questions when a caregiver rushed to the microphone, “Doctor, am I going to get Alzheimer’s disease too?” she asked worriedly.

For caregivers and family members, this question looms large. Forget a familiar name or appointment, make a mistake in a bank account, or burn something on the stove, and you ask yourself, “Is this it? Has my Alzheimer’s started?”

Don’t panic. While some types of Alzheimer’s may be more likely to be inherited than others, dementia expert David Troxel thinks our stress-filled, multi-tasking culture almost encourages forgetfulness: “We depend upon our smart phones to remind us of appointments, our cell phones are automatically programmed to dial a number, and our GPS systems take us where we want to go without much thinking.”

While many people are becoming a bit more forgetful because they aren’t exercising their brains, Troxel affirms that periodic memory lapses aren’t usually a sign of early Alzheimer’s, particularly in younger persons.

So, are you more likely to get Alzheimer’s if one of your parents have the disease? Here is a summary of the current thinking about the inheritability of Alzheimer’s.

Early-onset Alzheimer’s may be more inheritable

Alzheimer’s disease does run in some families, particularly in early onset cases in which someone gets the disease well before the age of 65. Fortunately, these devastating cases represent less than 5 percent of all diagnoses. If you have a parent or sibling in this situation, you may want to get him or her evaluated at a university research center. You may also want to undergo genetic testing yourself to better understand your family situation.

Later-onset Alzheimer’s is less inheritable

If you have a relative whose Alzheimer’s disease begins well after the age of 65, you probably only have a slight increase in risk, if any. This is good news for most family members, since late-onset dementia is by far the most common form of the disease. Families will often express concern that many of their elderly relatives experienced Alzheimer’s disease. They worry that it must run in the family since “four of my five uncles had dementia.” Troxel offers some reassuring words of advice, “Remember, almost half of all elders will develop dementia. This family’s experience might just reflect the average variations in percentages that impact us all.”

Assessing your risk

If you still want to assess your risk, you can talk with your physician about genetic testing. The most common test looks at a gene called APOE (apolipoprotein E) found on Chromosome 29. You receive one gene from your mother and one from your father. The test reveals whether you have an APOE 2, 3 or 4 from your mother and your father. A 2/2 combination seems to actually protect the brain; an APOE 4/4 greatly increases your risk.

Most medial professionals discourage blanket genetic testing, at least in its current form. An APOE test demonstrates risk but is not definitive. It will also not tell you when you will get Alzheimer’s—at 70, 80 or 95. This makes the information hard to use on a practical basis.

Prevention

While the evidence is not definitive, getting plenty of exercise, not smoking, controlling weight, eating a heart-friendly diet, and staying socially and intellectually active may help delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, or may even prevent it. If you have experienced Alzheimer’s disease in your family, take these positive wellness steps. They cannot hurt you but may help quite a bit!

Get your FREE Guide to Senior Inhome Care at www.seniorcarechoicessd.com

NEED a CAREGiverSM

Compassionate CAREGivers are ready to help seniors live independently at home.
Inquire about service today!

Become a CAREGiverSM

Seeking employment? Have what it takes to help seniors lead rewarding lives?
Inquire about being a CAREGiver

Jessica Perez
Office Manager

Home Instead Senior Care
Secure Care Inc.
9665 Granite Ridge Dr. Ste. 205
San Diego, CA 92123 USA
P: 858.277.3722
F: 858.277.6737
homeinsteadsd@aol.com
www.homeinstead.com/158
Each Home Instead Senior Care Franchise
is independently owned and operated.

Alzheimer’s and Dementia: Dealing with Clutter – San Diego Senior In Home Care


San Diego Senior In Home Care:

Alzheimer’s and Dementia:

How should I deal with my father’s clutter and unpaid bills?

Question: My father’s desk is cluttered with post-it notes, scraps of alzeheimers memory boxespaper, bills and financial statements. They aren’t being filed and I’m not sure they are being paid. What should I do?

You don’t mention whether your dad has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia. If he has been, and is still in the early stages, try working alongside him.

Sometimes people showing the early signs of dementia lose their “start button” and have trouble initiating an activity. This may be why your dad’s desk is a mess, even if he has historically been well organized. Here are some ideas for a successful “intervention.”

If you ask your dad, “do you want me to help you organize your desk?” he’ll probably say no. A gentler approach to pushing the start button might be to pick up something and say, “Hmm, look at this interesting letter. I didn’t see this before. I wonder what else is here. Shall we look together?” Side by side, you may begin to create some order.

If you really feel that important bills are going unpaid, you may just need to go in and clean up his desk. It’s often easier, as the old saying goes, to ask for forgiveness rather than for permission!

If the financial chaos is as bad as you suspect, consider these steps:

  • Encourage your dad to establish a financial power of attorney, or at least add a second signature to a checkbook so that someone else can pay the bills.
  • Have the most important bills sent to another address—yours, for example—so that you can stay on top of them.
  • Arrange to pay the bills online to reduce the amount of paper coming into your dad’s house.

If your dad hasn’t been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, now may be a good time to have him assessed. Even if Alzheimer’s is not the diagnosis, your dad may need more assistance as he ages. Before the paper stack gets any higher, your family needs to discuss how to keep your dad safe, solvent, and on top of his financial affairs.

Learn more about the stages of Alzheimer’s and Dementia.

Get your FREE Guide to Senior Inhome Care at www.seniorcarechoicessd.com

NEED a CAREGiverSM

Compassionate CAREGivers are ready to help seniors live independently at home.
Inquire about service today!

Become a CAREGiverSM

Seeking employment? Have what it takes to help seniors lead rewarding lives?
Inquire about being a CAREGiver

Jessica Perez
Office Manager

Home Instead Senior Care
Secure Care Inc.
9665 Granite Ridge Dr. Ste. 205
San Diego, CA 92123 USA
P: 858.277.3722
F: 858.277.6737
homeinsteadsd@aol.com
www.homeinstead.com/158
Each Home Instead Senior Care Franchise
is independently owned and operated.

“I Will Remember for You℠” Alzheimer’s Music Video


Oh the places you used to go,
All the people you used to know,
The stories that you loved to tell
About a life that you lived so well.

It’s fine, you can rest if you want to.
I will remember for you,
I will remember too.

Alzheimer’s Music Video.

Music is just a story with a melody. The song “I Will Remember for You”alzheimer family played in the video to the right tells the story of a couple touched by Alzheimer’s disease. It was written and performed by Home Instead Senior Care staff member Dave Mainelli, and is inspired by all the families they have met who are keeping the memories alive for loved ones experiencing memory loss. Music powerfully communicates emotion and narrative, making it an excellent tool to evoke memories for those living with Alzheimer’s or other dementias.

The Power of Music

A drum beat, a guitar strum, a melody, a song. A toe tap, a finger snap, and soon you’re humming along. Music can move us emotionally and physically without us having to even think about it. Its power to reach past the mind and touch the soul has a soothing therapeutic effect particularly beneficial to someone with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias.

A study published in the Journal of Music Therapy1 demonstrated that playing familiar background music helped to increase positive social behaviors in people with Alzheimer’s and decrease negative behaviors related to agitation.

Music has also been proven to drastically decrease anxiety and depression in people with Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study published in the Journal of Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders 2. One caregiver summed up her experience with music saying that she would wake her husband up every morning to the Louis Armstrong song, “Wonderful World,” and “He always started the day in a great mood.”

Even when the usual means of communication become inhibited by the effects of Alzheimer’s or other dementias, those experiencing memory loss still remember and respond to music.

You can leverage the power of music in a number of different ways to lift the spirits of a family member with dementia and unlock memories from long ago.

One way is to create a “life soundtrack” that includes memorable songs from your loved one’s childhood, teenage, young adult and older years. Research the top hits from each decade of your loved one’s life, find out what songs were played at his or her wedding, and pick out some well-loved hymns or carols. If your family member with dementia used to play a musical instrument, include music featuring that instrument as well.

You can also encourage your family member with dementia to not just listen but take part in the music making. According to Preserve Your Memory magazine3, singing daily has a positive effect on one’s mental state. Many senior centers and other community organizations provide opportunities to sing with a group, play an instrument (even if just a woodblock or tambourine), or simply clap along. And when you play the soundtrack you created for you loved one, sing along together. You may be surprised how many lyrics your loved one still remembers by heart.

Sources:

1. Journal of Music Therapy, Winter 2007: “The Effect of Background Stimulative Music on Behavior in Alzheimer’s Patients”

2. Journal of Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, July 2009: “Effect of Music Therapy on Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Alzheimer’s Type Dementia”

3. Preserve Your Memory, Winter 2011: “Celebrating Senior Sounds.”

Subscribe to http://www.homeinsteadsd.wordpress.com and get these great stories right in your email. Just put in your email on the right.

Get your FREE Guide to Senior Inhome Care at www.seniorcarechoicessd.com

NEED a CAREGiverSM

Compassionate CAREGivers are ready to help seniors live independently at home.
Inquire about service today!

Become a CAREGiverSM

Seeking employment? Have what it takes to help seniors lead rewarding lives?
Inquire about being a CAREGiver

Jessica Perez
Office Manager

Home Instead Senior Care
Secure Care Inc.
9665 Granite Ridge Dr. Ste. 205
San Diego, CA 92123 USA
P: 858.277.3722
F: 858.277.6737
homeinsteadsd@aol.com
www.homeinstead.com/158
Each Home Instead Senior Care Franchise
is independently owned and operated.

Alzheimer’s and Dementia: The Power of Smell to Evoke Memories


For someone with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias smell has the strongest and most direct connection to memory. A lawn mower drones in the distance and a warm breeze blows through the open window carrying in the scent of freshly cut grass. What memories does that smell bring to mind? In your mind’s eye, maybe you see your father mowing the yard on his tractor, perhaps you’re riding bikes again with the kids down the street through the neighborhood where you grew up, or maybe you just feel the spirit of youthfulness that comes with the first whiff of spring. Whatever memory that poignant grassy smell triggers, chances are it takes you far back in time.

Among the five senses, smell has the strongest and most direct connection to memory. With the ability to conjure quite distant—yet strikingly vivid—memories, smell can be a powerful memory stimulant for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias.

A study conducted by Stockholm University revealed that smells have the tendency to take someone further back in time than verbal or visual memory cues. When introduced to a smell memory cue, participants in the study, whose average age was 75, most frequently recalled memories from early childhood.1

Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias typically erode short term memory functions before it affects the ability to recall events from one’s distant past, which makes smell a useful means of triggering those memories still intact.

Other senses have the ability to arouse feeling and memories in a person with dementia, but smell is the most direct. According to psychologist Maria Larsson, “The two cerebral structures, the amygdala and the hippocampus play an important role for the storing of memories, and the olfactory nerve has very direct connections to both structures.”1

Help your family member with dementia feel the strong emotions and warm memories associated with smells by popping a batch of cookies in the oven, go for a walk just after it rains, fold the laundry together, or come up with activity ideas of your own that will generate aromas particularly significant to your loved one. Saw dust, a campfire, garlic bread, a fine red wine, perfume, pine, and soap are just a few ideas of scents that may unlock rich, emotional memories and bring comfort to someone with dementia.

Source:

  1. Center for Advanced Study newsletter April 2004

Subscribe to http://www.homeinsteadsd.wordpress.com and get these great stories right in your email. Just put in your email on the right.

Get your FREE Guide to Senior Inhome Care at www.seniorcarechoicessd.com

NEED a CAREGiverSM

Compassionate CAREGivers are ready to help seniors live independently at home.
Inquire about service today!

Become a CAREGiverSM

Seeking employment? Have what it takes to help seniors lead rewarding lives?
Inquire about being a CAREGiver

Jessica Perez
Office Manager

Home Instead Senior Care
Secure Care Inc.
9665 Granite Ridge Dr. Ste. 205
San Diego, CA 92123 USA
P: 858.277.3722
F: 858.277.6737
homeinsteadsd@aol.com
www.homeinstead.com/158
Each Home Instead Senior Care Franchise
is independently owned and operated.

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Tips – Create a Memory Box


alzeheimers memory boxesTom felt the weight of a baseball gripped in his sweaty palm from inside the thick leather fold of his baseball glove, and suddenly he was back on the pitcher”s mound. He took the ball in his other hand, running his thumb across the red laces and saw it flying toward the other team”s star batter. “Strikeout!”

For a person with Alzheimer”s or other dementias, the sense of touch can trigger memories in a way that other forms of communication cannot. To stimulate tactile memories for a family member with dementia, first figure out what items may hold special significance for that person. Did your loved one play a sport? An instrument? Spend a lot of time in the kitchen? The garden? The workshop? Then collect relevant items in one location so they”re easy to pull out when that person needs to be calmed or comforted.

The memory “box” can take a number of forms—maybe a basket, an inexpensive plastic container with snap-on lid, a designated shelf or drawer, or a shoebox for smaller items. Putting the box together could be a fun, intergenerational activity for your family. Enlist the help of the grandchildren to decorate the box or contribute to the collection.

The memory box can include any item that might mean something to the person with dementia:

  • A baseball glove
  • Gardening gloves
  • Different types of fabric
  • A favorite article of clothing
  • A trophy
  • Trip souvenirs
  • A family heirloom
  • A stuffed animal
  • A musical instrument

Or, you may want to get creative and create themed memory boxes with items relating to a specific experience:

Trip to the Beach Memory Box:

  • Sea shells
  • Pan filled with sand, large enough to place feet in
  • Dried starfish
  • Beach towel
  • Sun tan lotion

Nature Walk Memory Box:

  • Leaves
  • Tree bark
  • Flower petals
  • Pine cones
  • Acorns
  • Rocks
  • Pot of soil (particularly if the person likes gardening)

Have the person with dementia hold each item and encourage that person to share what that object brings to mind. You can talk about how it feels—bumpy, smooth, fuzzy, hard—and what memories the person associates with it.

The possibilities for what you might place in a memory box are endless. Use your creativity to create a memory-stimulating collection of items customized specifically to the person with dementia.

Subscribe to http://www.homeinsteadsd.wordpress.com and get these great stories right in your email. Just put in your email on the right.

Get your FREE Guide to Senior Inhome Care at www.seniorcarechoicessd.com

NEED a CAREGiverSM

Compassionate CAREGivers are ready to help seniors live independently at home.
Inquire about service today!

Become a CAREGiverSM

Seeking employment? Have what it takes to help seniors lead rewarding lives?
Inquire about being a CAREGiver

Jessica Perez
Office Manager

Home Instead Senior Care
Secure Care Inc.
9665 Granite Ridge Dr. Ste. 205
San Diego, CA 92123 USA
P: 858.277.3722
F: 858.277.6737
homeinsteadsd@aol.com
www.homeinstead.com/158
Each Home Instead Senior Care Franchise
is independently owned and operated.